Topic: Florida Developments

LL Surplus Lines Series (Entry 9): Florida and California Make News on Broker and Agent Fees

Earlier this month, Florida passed House Bill 301 to remove the cap on the amount of fees that may be charged by a surplus lines broker in connection with the procurement of surplus lines insurance for a prospective insured. Instead of the old cap of a maximum of $35 per policy, surplus lines brokers will be able to charge any fee that is “reasonable” and disclosed to the insured in advance.

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LL Surplus Lines Series (Entry 5): 2019 WSIA Spring Surplus Lines Law Group Meeting Recap and Summary of Trends

The Surplus Lines Law Group held its spring meeting on Friday, April 5 in Biloxi, Mississippi. A number of presentations were given at the meeting, including updates on the trends around the nation with respect to the diligence search requirement, international tax and cybersecurity issues, as well as a presentation by this author as to the challenges surrounding placing group insurance coverage on a surplus lines basis (including unique hurdles applicable to risk purchasing groups).

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2018 Statewide Elections: A Mixed Bag for Insurers?

All eyes have been focused on the federal mid-term elections and the impact on the U.S. House and Senate. Post-mortems by the pundits have begun. See Locke Lord’s take on the mid-terms. The divided government in Washington, D.C. may well stymie efforts to regulate the insurance industry at the federal level, except in very limited circumstances where bi-partisan accord can be achieved.

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Florida Appellate Court Provides Insurers with Potentially Powerful Tool to Combat Abusive Assignment of Benefit Litigation

The logjam may have broken in Florida assignment of benefits litigation. Insurers and the bar that represents them have searched for a response a costly wave of costly litigation that has a arisen in recent years where insureds have assigned their homeowners’ insurance proceeds to  contractors that perform needed repairs and then submit bills to the insurer that frequently are inflated, touching off litigation in which the contractor (or, more accurately, its lawyer) is emboldened by the threat of recovery of attorneys’ fees.

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